Understanding NBCC's National Certifications

NCC Application Requirements Changes

Part of NBCC's mission is to enhance the professional identity of National Certified Counselors (NCCs). NBCC accomplishes this goal in several ways, including evaluating and modifying degree requirements for the NCC credential. This ensures that certificants have a degree relevant to the current state of the counseling profession. The NBCC Board of Directors recently approved several application requirement changes.

NCC Application Requirements Changes

The National Certified Counselor (NCC)

The NCC certification was launched by NBCC in 1983 as a result of the efforts of members of the American Counseling Association (ACA). Since that time, NBCC has become an independent entity and more than 80,000 counselors have become NCCs. The NCC is one of two NBCC certifications that are accredited by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA). The NCC is the prerequisite for all specialty certifications (below) with NBCC.

The National Counselor Examination for Licensure and Certification (NCE) is required for this certification.

Specialty Certifications

NBCC also offers three specialty certifications. All three require the National Certified Counselor certification as a prerequisite or corequisite.

The Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor (CCMHC)

The CCMHC was launched originally in 1979 by the National Academy for Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselors. In 1993, the Academy and NBCC reached an agreement for NBCC to take over administration and testing for the CCMHC certification. Over 1100 NCCs currently hold the CCMHC certification.

The National Clinical Mental Health Counselor Examination (NCMHCE) is required for this certification.

The National Certified School Counselor (NCSC)

The NCSC certification was launched in 1991 in cooperation with the American School Counselor Association (ASCA). There are more than 2,500 NCCs who also hold the NCSC certification.

The National Certified School Counselor Examination (NCSCE) is required for this certification.

The Master Addictions Counselor (MAC)

The MAC certification was first offered in 1995 and testing with the EMAC began in 1996. The MAC is one of two NBCC certifications that is accredited by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA). The MAC is also recognized and accepted by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) as qualifying for the Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) training and credential. More than 700 NCCs currently hold the MAC.

The Examination for Master Addictions Counselors (EMAC) is required for this certification.